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Book Review

Kane of Old Mars

by Michael Moorcock

Kane of Old Mars by Michael Moorcock

If you missed out on Michael Moorcock the first time around, the collated paperback editions of his work from Gollancz are an excellent way to discover his stories. Kane of Old Mars collects three Kane books, Warriors of Mars, Blades of Mars and Barbarians of Mars. All of Moorcock’s adventures are ultimately connected through the premise of the Eternal Champion.

Readers of the collated Nomad of Time trilogy, which follows the adventures of Oswald Bastable will quickly recognise the ...

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reviewed by Allen Stroud on Thursday 16 April 2015
Book Review

Sword of the North

by Luke Scull

Sword of the North by Luke Scull

The first novel in The Grim Company was a singular example of the traditional fantasy novel for the 21st century. I stand by my comment of it being one of best fantasy novels of 2013. Sword of the North is the direct sequel to this debut and follows the spectacular events at the end of the first book.

Ir begins however 36 years before, with some suitably grim backstory which describes the path of Brodar Kayne and how he eventually becomes the swordsman he is and friend the legendary...

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reviewed by Ant on Monday 13 April 2015
Book Review

Dead Water and Other Weird Tales

by David A Sutton

Dead Water and Other Weird Tales by David A Sutton

David Sutton’s fascination with horror stories has led him to a considerable career immersed in the macabre and terrifying. Looking back over his work it is surprising to me that I’m only just discovering him as a writer, although I am indebted to his editorial skills on Dark Horizons, a British Fantasy Society journal collection I read many years ago.

Dead Water and Other Weird Tales is a wide ranging mix of work, drawing inspiration from a multitude of different sources. Though th...

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reviewed by Allen Stroud on Saturday 11 April 2015
Book Review

The Boy who wept blood

by Den Patrick

The Boy who wept blood by Den Patrick

The Boy who wept blood is the sequel to Den Patrick's impressive novel, The Boy with the Porcelain Blade. Set some time after the events of the first book, the Queen Anea now rules Demense. A fairer society is being built on the ashes of the old regime however many of the old players are reluctant to give up their power.

It falls to Dino to find out whats going on and hopefully put a stop to it and prevent this fledgling republic falling before its begun.

It's an interesti...

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reviewed by Ant on Friday 10 April 2015
Article

Gollancz April 2015 Paperbacks

This month Gollancz paperback releases include a number of unmissable novels.

Paperback of the month is Peter Higgins Truth and Fear, the superb follow-up to the singular novel Wolfhound Century - SFBook of the year for 2013 and a 21st century classic in the making. Set in an alternative Russia with a vast forest and ancient god-like powers, Truth and Fear continues ...

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written by Ant on Thursday 09 April 2015
Book Review

A Fistful of Clones

by Seaton Kay-Smith

A Fistful of Clones by Seaton Kay-Smith

Occasionally a book and a writer comes along that breaks rules left right and centre, but does so with panache and style that makes you tip your hat. The beginning of A Fistful of Clones clearly sets it out to be one of those books; an accessible science fiction comedy that immediately endears, the author clearly subjugating all the dos and don’ts to a quirky indulgent style that matches the neuroses of the main character, Henry.

The sketch of our hero is refreshingly honest and cle...

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reviewed by Allen Stroud on Wednesday 08 April 2015
Book Review

A Memory of Light

by Robert Jordan

A Memory of Light by Robert Jordan

For those who have been following the journey of Jordans' epic fantasy series, reaching this book will likely feel bittersweet. The first book (The Eye of the World) was published over 25 years ago, a quarter of a century. I actually bought this book the day came out at the beginning of 2013 however it's taken me till now to get a chance to read the huge, weighty thing. Mostly this delay was caused by the continued mountainous pile of reviews to be read. Also though having read the previous 1...

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reviewed by Ant on Tuesday 07 April 2015
Article

RIP Hugo and your Awards

The Hugo awards, often considered to be the most coveted and prestigious award within the SFF genre, has always had a political side — this isn't news and to be fair it would be almost impossible to find an award that isn't influenced in some way by those who organise and of course those who vote. I've always tried to stay away from these politics, as a reader and reviewe...

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written by Ant on Monday 06 April 2015
Book Review

Mechalarum

by Emma Larkins

Mechalarum by Emma Larkins

The product of a 2013 Kickstarter, Mechalarum is Emma Larkins debut work and has clearly benefited from her efforts to crowd fund. The process has allowed her creative control and enabled her to seek professional assistance in assuring the work comes up to scratch.

And come up to scratch it does, with a fetching cover and intriguing blurb. The initial reading is no let down either, beginning at a good pace with a tight and consistent viewpoint style. The idea of flying freely in a s...

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reviewed by Allen Stroud on Sunday 05 April 2015
Book Review

A New Darkness

by Joseph Delaney

Spooks: A New Darkness by Joseph Delaney

I remember reading the very first Spooks book a number of years ago and really enjoying it. Never having been sent any to review until since I've had little opportunity to read any others in the now quite size-able series (13 volumes at the time of writing). It's clear I should have read more Delaney than I have, not least due to the fact the series is set around my home town of Lancaster and the county of Lancashire. This novel even features the area I work (Kirby Lonsdale). Delaney lives so...

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reviewed by Ant on Friday 03 April 2015
Book Review

Star Splinter

by John Cressey

Star Splinter by John Cressey

Lieutenant Callum (called California, Cal or Harper) Harper punches his Captain, Laurence Decker for being incompetent and letting soldiers die on a mission we (initially) don’t learn much about. Cal has time and the option to finish things off but backs down and so gets re-assigned back to Earth. On the way for reasons unknown, his spaceship gets diverted and he crash lands on terraformed Mars. There he learns Earth has been destroyed and he’s been left with a group of army rejects who he ha...

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reviewed by Allen Stroud on Thursday 02 April 2015
Article

Review: Such a Dark Thing by M. Jess Peacock

M. Jess Peacock has clearly led an interesting life, drawing all manner of examples out of an imaginative childhood for re-examination under the academic’s microscope. This exploration of the vampire archetype and its application in a multitude of fiction highlights several themes, allowing us to view this icon of horror fiction through the discussion of its variations. From Dracula to Lestat, Angel and bey...

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written by Allen Stroud on Tuesday 31 March 2015

Science fiction, fantasy & horror book reviews

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