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Book Review

The Crying Machine by Greg Chivers

The Crying Machine by Greg Chivers

Science documentary producer Greg Chivers’ first novel is a delightful combination of sci-fi, politics, and the three strange characters ensconced within them.

Chivers’ future Jerusalem is a city all but ignored as irrelevant by the world’s leaders, and in its anonymity the Holy City has become a haven for smugglers, exiles and extremists. While flying under the radar of the globe’s superpowers, the Middle Eastern metropolis teems with dubious characters, black...

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review written by Alice Wybrew on Monday 22nd April 2019
Book Review

No Way by S J Morden

No Way by S J Morden

No Way is the follow up to the gripping thriller One Way.  A perilous journey to the Red Planet by a group of convicts. Deciding that it was much more economically viable to train people that would have otherwise rotted in a jail rather than a group of experienced and highly trained Astronauts forms the basis of the story.

I can't really mention any more than that without spoilers to this first book - so if you haven't read One Way and are meaning to, it's best not to read any fu...

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review written by Ant on Friday 19th April 2019
Book Review

Master & Apprentice by Claudia Gray

Master & Apprentice by Claudia Gray

With the new films, TV shows and cartoons it is sometimes hard to keep up with the Star Wars Universe and all its moving parts. Some of the less fashionable elements could be ignored in favour of big flashy characters like Han Solo or Boba Fett. Thankfully, the Star Wars books are continuing to explore the entire timeline including the somewhat maligned The Phantom Menace. I am an apologist for this film and particularly liked the relationship between Jedi Knight, Qui-Gon Jinn, and his Padawa...

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review written by Sam Tyler on Tuesday 16th April 2019
Book Review

Record of a Spaceborn Few by Becky Chambers

Record of a Spaceborn Few by Becky Chambers

A Hopeful Future

Review kindly provided by Vanessa Smyth. 

Welcome to the third and latest instalment in The Wayfarers series, Record of a Spaceborn Few by Becky Chambers. This current narrative is set within the same captivating universe as the first two books and, despite a few oblique character links, this is an original story which can be read as a standalone novel, though I would recommend reading it in sequence. This is because you will get a sense of Chambers&rsquo...

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review written by Vanessa Smyth on Friday 12th April 2019
Book Review

The Magnificent Nine by James Lovegrove

The Magnificent Nine by James Lovegrove

Any show on the US TV network Fox has to realise that its days could be numbered. Fox have the reputation of axing cult shows before their time from Arrested Development to Family Guy. Despite their cancelation these shows are still being made. Firefly was not so lucky. This was a science fiction/western mash up that just cost a little too much for Fox to fund for more than a dozen episodes or so. But like a typical Joss Whedon character, the show would not stay dead. With the great film Sere...

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review written by Sam Tyler on Tuesday 9th April 2019
Book Review

The Passengers by John Marrs

The Passengers by John Marrs

Call me old fashioned, I am a little scared of the future. This is a sentiment that will hit many of us eventually. What is wrong with the way technology works right now? Do I really need to talk to my speakers or plug myself into the Matrix just to order a pizza? The idea of getting behind the wheel of an automatic car gives me the heebie-jeebies, but just this week laws are being passed to allow cars to limit your speed by pinging up to a satellite. A future in which all cars are automated ...

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review written by Sam Tyler on Friday 29th March 2019
Book Review

Molten Heart by Una McCormack

Molten Heart by Una McCormack

Back in the day the Doctor Who spin off novels had a real advantage over the TV show as they had no budget. The limit to what could happen in these books was not down to the pen pushers at the BBC or the naivety of special effects. The only limit to the books was the author’s imagination. Go big or go home as no one will tell you no. By Doctor Number 13, even the BBC can pretty much do what they want with CGI so the novels have lost one of their unique selling points. Molten Heart by Un...

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review written by Sam Tyler on Tuesday 26th March 2019
Book Review

The Buried Dagger by James Swallow

The Buried Dagger by James Swallow

So this is it, the 54th and final book in the Horus Heresy series. But before you despair, it isn't the end of the story and the mad Titan Horus is only just knocking on the doors of Terra. The final battle will be played out over a series of novels called the Siege of Terra, presumably ending with the legendary fight of Horus against the Emperor. That series starts with The Solar War, coming out in May this year. Black Library have promised that this series won't be drawn out into anoth...

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review written by Ant on Monday 25th March 2019
Book Review

Titan Death by Guy Haley

Titan Death by Guy Haley

The 53rd and penultimate book in the epic Horus Heresy series and the brave soldiers of the Emperor attempt to hold back the armies of chaos from reaching Terra.

The line is drawn on Beta-Garmon and god-machines of the Adeptus Titanicus are at the front. Horus has defeated all that have stood before him, even the Emperor's own Executioner - the Primarch of the Space Wolves Leman Russ.

There only remains on more book after this one in Black Libraries momentous Horus Heresy...

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review written by Ant on Monday 18th March 2019
Book Review

The Telling by Ursula K Le Guin

The Telling by Ursula K Le Guin

What is religion?

Most of us aren’t used to contemplating that question too hard. The answer seems self-evident. In the world around us now, we have Christianity, Judaism, and Islam as the big three monotheistic religions. India and East Asia provide numerous examples of the polytheistic variety. It might be tempting to fall back on some seeming truism, such as, “all religions are about adherence to a set of rules,” but stray outside of those big three monotheis...

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review written by Matt Buscemi on Sunday 3rd March 2019
Book Review

Captain Marvel: Liberation Run by Tess Sharpe

Captain Marvel: Liberation Run by Tess Sharpe

It is not hard to see where Marvel Studios get all their ideas from as they sit upon a rich heritage of characters and storylines that will take decades to exhaust. I am somewhat of an old school Marvel fan and know the classic runs. Therefore, the newer creations flummox me. Captain Marvel is more new wave than my knowledge allows, but that has not stopped me looking forward to the upcoming feature film. What better way to enter the theatre, but by doing some revision in the form of Tess Sha...

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review written by Sam Tyler on Saturday 2nd March 2019
Book Review

Junction by Daniel M Bensen

Junction by Daniel M Bensen

Junction asks the question: what would we do if we had access to a brand new, virgin world? Would we destroy it like we are doing with our own world? Or would we learn from our mistakes and treat this as a second chance to do things right?

Daisuke Matsumori is a Japanese nature show host who happens to be in the right part of the world when the wormhole is discovered in the highlands of Papau New Guinea. Passing through the wormhole leads to an alien world of competing ecosystems, com...

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review written by Ant on Friday 1st March 2019
p>Science Fiction novels are stories about an imaginary fantastic future, especially space travel. Science Fiction usually refers to technological abilities that are theoretically possible based on current understandings and there have been many cases were past Science Fiction authors have accurately gauged this technology and years later it has come to pass.

Science fiction book reviews are available here from stories that have been written by the great science fictions like Arthur C Clarke, Isaac Asimov and Ray Bradbury to the new breed of classic writers such as Allen Steele and science fiction book reviews of the independent and self published authors...

There are so many truly outstanding scifi books out there that it can be very difficult to choose them apart. Listed here are some of the more popular or most read worthy novels available, however if you know of one you would like to see added, let us know, or better yet send us your review and we will see it included on the site.

Experience is not what happens to you; it's what you do with what happens to you.
- Aldous Huxley

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