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Science Fiction Book Reviews

Book Review

The Gone World by Tom Sweterlitsch

The Gone World by Tom Sweterlitsch

This Christmas a member of the family introduced me to NCIS. For those who have yet to discover this long-running US-based TV show it's a police-procedural series that follows the Naval Criminal Investigation Service. Until this time I hadn't even known such an organisation existed, not to mention the fact that most of the show seems to be based on land, not sea.

Why do I mention this? Coincidentally one of the first books I pick up after watching this show is The Gone World...

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review written by Ant on Tuesday 6th February 2018
Book Review

After Atlas by Emma Newman

After Atlas by Emma Newman

After Atlas is Newman’s follow up to her science fiction debut, Planetfall. This story is not a sequel, instead it focuses on our future Earth, that has been left behind by the colonists on the Atlas mission.

This aftermath is the setting for a murder mystery plot involving a selection of those left behind by their relatives who went into space. Our narrator is Carlos Moreno, son of one of the colonists, who was left behind as a child with his father, while his mother disappeared ...

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review written by Allen Stroud on Sunday 4th February 2018
Book Review

Elysium Fire by Alastair Reynolds

Elysium Fire by Alastair Reynolds

Elysium Fire is the sequel to Aurora Rising (also known as The Prefect), set in Reynold's Revelation Space universe but before events of his previous novels. Like Aurora Rising, it can be read as a stand-alone novel.

It's the 25th century (with no Buck Rogers in sight) and humanity has, in many ways, moved on significantly from the Trumpocalypse / raging commercialism of the 21st century. The Glitter Band is a collection of ten-thousand habitats orbiting the planet Yellowsto...

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review written by Ant on Wednesday 24th January 2018
Book Review

Aurora Rising by Alastair Reynolds

Aurora Rising by Alastair Reynolds

Aurora Rising is a stand-alone novel written within the authors Revelation Space universe, set before other novels and before the cataclysmic event of the Melding Plague.

It's worth noting that Aurora Rising was published in 2007 as The Prefect. Reynolds fan's who are looking for a new book will need to wait for the sequel, Elysium Fire which is out in a few days. Aurora Rising was nominated for the Locus Award and BSFA for Best Novel back in 2007. In my opinion only loosing...

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review written by Ant on Monday 22nd January 2018
Book Review

Artemis by Andy Weir

Artemis by Andy Weir

The global success of The Martian and its subsequent film adaptation, catapulted Andy Weir into the public eye. Whatever he chose to write next was always going to draw attention.

Set in our near future, Artemis is the story of Jazz Bashara, a young girl living on the moon. Struggling to make a life for herself, Jazz becomes embroiled in a criminal sabotage operation, placing herself, her friends and the whole colony in peril. Her experiences teach her more than she might ever want ...

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review written by Allen Stroud on Wednesday 17th January 2018
Book Review

Zoe's Tale by John Scalzi

Zoe's Tale by John Scalzi

Zoe’s Tale is one of the Old Man War series of books by John Scalzi and covers the same time period and events as The Last Colony, (the previous book in the series) but from a different character’s perspective.  Despite this, it can be read as a standalone novel. 

Zoe is moving to a new colony with her adopted family. She’s not an ordinary girl by our standards or by those of her peers.Zoe’s unique circumstances mean that she takes with her two alien bodyguards and the ho...

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review written by Karen Fishwick on Wednesday 13th December 2017
Book Review

The Bastard Legion by Gavin Smith

The Bastard Legion by Gavin Smith

The Bastard Legion is the latest Military Science Fiction from Gavin Smith, very much in the style of his earlier book Veteran and its sequel War in Heaven, although not connected in terms of plot or characters. 

Smith’s hard hitting protagonist is Miska Corbin, a thief and hacker who steals a prison ship full of dangerous criminals to facilitate her new commercial concept or perhaps to fill the aching void in her life left by the her father’s death. 

Needless to say...

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review written by Karen Fishwick on Wednesday 29th November 2017
Book Review

Austral by Paul McAuley

Austral by Paul McAuley

Paul McAuley is a vastly under-appreciated author. His books are inspiring, hypnotic and inventive. Austral is all of these and more, a book set in a plausible, climate-changed future where the planet has a new continent with a partial thawing of the Antarctic. There are still vast vistas of ice but there's also large expanses of grass and trees and other flora.

The planet isn't the only thing that's changed, people have too - or at least some. Experiments in genetic eng...

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review written by Ant on Tuesday 28th November 2017
Book Review

The Wind by Jay Caselberg

The Wind by Jay Caselberg

Newcon Press’ second novella series is a beautiful collection of four books. The Wind by Jay Caselberg launches straight into the kind of folk horror/ weird fiction premise that seems to emerge from a particular sense of British society. There are shades of Mythago Wood and The Wickerman in Caselberg’s story.

Gerry has recently moved to the isolated village of Abbotsford to become the town’s vet. As he’s settling in, a strange wind springs up, causing concern amongst the loc...

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review written by Allen Stroud on Friday 10th November 2017
Book Review

Doorways in the Sand by Roger Zelazny

Doorways in the Sand by Roger Zelazny

I have always been a fan of Roger Zelazny. When I was a teenager, The Chronicles of Amber were a library book quest to find the whole set, which never quite happened, so it wasn’t until later in adult life that I was able to purchase the bumper edition that contained them all.

Doorways in the Sand was first published in hardback and paperback in 1976, the year I was born after being serialised in Analogue magazine. It has now been republished by Farrago, and the new edition revive...

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review written by Allen Stroud on Thursday 2nd November 2017
Book Review

Crosstalk by Connie Willis

Crosstalk by Connie Willis

You hear about those couples having the ill-concieved notion of getting matching permanent tattoos shortly after they've met, despite the real probability their relationship may not last. Crossover goes one further with that premise.

Instead of tattoos it's a "simple" medical procedure (EED) that will permanently allow each to share what the other is feeling through an empathic connection. There isn't any way back from it.

Briddey thinks its a romantic, thought...

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review written by Ant on Monday 30th October 2017
Book Review

Electric Dreams by Philip K Dick

Electric Dreams by Philip K Dick

It's great to see Philip K Dick stories continue to be explored and consumed in different forms of media. His writing still popular long after his death. For those who aren't aware, the UK TV station Channel 4 (Broadcast in the US via Amazon Video) has started a new 10 part anthology series called Electric Dreams. It's based on PKD's short stories and it captures the authors imagination, ideas and voice perfectly.

It's nothing short of astounding and features a ...

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review written by Ant on Monday 23rd October 2017
p>Science Fiction novels are stories about an imaginary fantastic future, especially space travel. Science Fiction usually refers to technological abilities that are theoretically possible based on current understandings and there have been many cases were past Science Fiction authors have accurately gauged this technology and years later it has come to pass.

Science fiction book reviews are available here from stories that have been written by the great science fictions like Arthur C Clarke, Isaac Asimov and Ray Bradbury to the new breed of classic writers such as Allen Steele and science fiction book reviews of the independent and self published authors...

There are so many truly outstanding scifi books out there that it can be very difficult to choose them apart. Listed here are some of the more popular or most read worthy novels available, however if you know of one you would like to see added, let us know, or better yet send us your review and we will see it included on the site.

Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn?t go away.
- Philip K Dick

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