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Book Review

The Wind by Jay Caselberg

The Wind by Jay Caselberg

Newcon Press’ second novella series is a beautiful collection of four books. The Wind by Jay Caselberg launches straight into the kind of folk horror/ weird fiction premise that seems to emerge from a particular sense of British society. There are shades of Mythago Wood and The Wickerman in Caselberg’s story.

Gerry has recently moved to the isolated village of Abbotsford to become the town’s vet. As he’s settling in, a strange wind springs up, causing concern amongst the loc...

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review written by Allen Stroud on Friday 10th November 2017
Book Review

Doorways in the Sand by Roger Zelazny

Doorways in the Sand by Roger Zelazny

I have always been a fan of Roger Zelazny. When I was a teenager, The Chronicles of Amber were a library book quest to find the whole set, which never quite happened, so it wasn’t until later in adult life that I was able to purchase the bumper edition that contained them all.

Doorways in the Sand was first published in hardback and paperback in 1976, the year I was born after being serialised in Analogue magazine. It has now been republished by Farrago, and the new edition revive...

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review written by Allen Stroud on Thursday 2nd November 2017
Book Review

Crosstalk by Connie Willis

Crosstalk by Connie Willis

You hear about those couples having the ill-concieved notion of getting matching permanent tattoos shortly after they've met, despite the real probability their relationship may not last. Crossover goes one further with that premise.

Instead of tattoos it's a "simple" medical procedure (EED) that will permanently allow each to share what the other is feeling through an empathic connection. There isn't any way back from it.

Briddey thinks its a romantic, thought...

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review written by Ant on Monday 30th October 2017
Book Review

Electric Dreams by Philip K Dick

Electric Dreams by Philip K Dick

It's great to see Philip K Dick stories continue to be explored and consumed in different forms of media. His writing still popular long after his death. For those who aren't aware, the UK TV station Channel 4 (Broadcast in the US via Amazon Video) has started a new 10 part anthology series called Electric Dreams. It's based on PKD's short stories and it captures the authors imagination, ideas and voice perfectly.

It's nothing short of astounding and features a ...

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review written by Ant on Monday 23rd October 2017
Book Review

Killing is my Business by Adam Christopher

Killing is my Business by Adam Christopher

Killing is my Business (not to be confused with Megadeth's debut album) is the second novel in Adam Christopher's LA Trilogy, following on from Made to Kill.

Featuring the robot Assassin Raymond Electromatic, disguised as LA's only artificial private investigator. it's a unique blend of hardboiled detective Noir and science fiction that has a distincive 1950's / 19060's aesthetic. Imagine raymond chandler writing an "Amazing Science" story. 

Our ...

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review written by Ant on Friday 13th October 2017
Book Review

The Furthest Station by Ben Aaronovitch

The Furthest Station by Ben Aaronovitch

The Furthest Station is a new novella that continues the adventures of PC Grant and the Folly in the Rivers of London series, investigating crimes that are a bit more out of the ordinary.

PC Grant joins British Transport Police officer Jaget Kumar to investigate ghost sightings on the Metropolitan line. While ghost sightings themselves are not out of the ordinary for the Folly, these ghosts seem to be agressive in the pursuit of something unknown. Investigating such events prove dif...

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review written by Ant on Monday 9th October 2017
Book Review

After the Flare by Deji Bryce Olukotun

After the Flare by Deji Bryce Olukotun

After the Flare is the second book in the series which describes the a near future Nigerian Space program. Since a massive solar flare wiped out much of the worlds electronics, Nigeria find themselves in control of one of the last working spaceships and functional spaceport.

Kwesi Bracket, formerly of NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Lab, is welcomed onto the Nigerian space program, due in part to his experience in building Astronaut training systems. His work of building a training po...

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review written by Ant on Wednesday 4th October 2017
Book Review

Alien Covenant - Origins by Alan Dean Foster

Alien Covenant - Origins by Alan Dean Foster

Alien Covenant - Origins is a prequel to the latest Alien story, describing the journey of getting the colony ship launched on it's ill-fated journey, bridging the gap between Prometheus and Alien Covenant.

Written by Alan Dean Foster - the author who has been writing about Aliens since the very beginning - it's the only Alien novel I know of that doesn't directly feature the black shiny creatures. That doesn't make the story any less engaging though and it does me...

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review written by Ant on Monday 2nd October 2017
Book Review

Clade by James Bradley

Clade by James Bradley

Apocalyptic fiction has been growing in popularity for years, with most stories following some big cataclysmic event such as a zombie uprising, sweeping plague, nuclear war or the rise of artificial intelligence.

Recently though novels have started to appear that seem much closer to reality, some of them so feasible they seem less science fiction and more plausible possibility.

Clade is one such novel.

Mass animal deaths, spiraling, uncontrollable weather, a...

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review written by Ant on Friday 29th September 2017
Book Review

The Slant by Robert Gibson

The Slant by Robert Gibson

It's funny how you can read books as far afield as China and Australia and not realise there are talented authors on your own doorstep. I  discovered the author Robert Gibson in Morecambe bay, only a few miles from my home. Robert has been writing science fiction stories for a number of years, The Slant was his first novel and is the beginning of The Kroth series.

The Slant tells the story of young Duncan Wemyss who finds himself transported to a strange world after witnessing ...

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review written by Ant on Monday 4th September 2017
Book Review

Dune by Frank Herbert

Dune by Frank Herbert

It's hard to believe that Dune is over 50 years old. Originally released in 1965 it won the inaugral Nebula award for best novel and tied with Roger Zelazny's This Immortal for the Hugo Award.

It's sold well in excess of 12 million copies around the world and is one of the world's best-selling science fiction novels. Some critics have gone so far as to call it the best science fiction book ever written. Robert Heinlein said of it:

Powerful, convincing, a...

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review written by Ant on Wednesday 9th August 2017
Book Review

The War of the Worlds by HG Wells

The War of the Worlds by HG Wells

The War of the Worlds was originally written in 1897 and it's never been out of print. It's one of the earliest stories to depict conflict with an alien race and has been influential in film, radio, TV, music and even science. The Guardian has gone as far as to say:

A true classic that has pointed the way not just for science-fiction writers, but for how we as a civilisation might think of ourselves

To celebrate this wonderful story, The Folio Society have cre...

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review written by Ant on Monday 7th August 2017
p>Science Fiction novels are stories about an imaginary fantastic future, especially space travel. Science Fiction usually refers to technological abilities that are theoretically possible based on current understandings and there have been many cases were past Science Fiction authors have accurately gauged this technology and years later it has come to pass.

Science fiction book reviews are available here from stories that have been written by the great science fictions like Arthur C Clarke, Isaac Asimov and Ray Bradbury to the new breed of classic writers such as Allen Steele and science fiction book reviews of the independent and self published authors...

There are so many truly outstanding scifi books out there that it can be very difficult to choose them apart. Listed here are some of the more popular or most read worthy novels available, however if you know of one you would like to see added, let us know, or better yet send us your review and we will see it included on the site.

The only people I know who still believe in hell are the ones who had the proper kind of upbringing.
- Mark Twain

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