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Book Review

This Body's Not Big Enough for Both of Us by Edgar Cantero

This Body's Not Big Enough for Both of Us by Edgar Cantero

The crime genre is very well established and has many shortcuts and tropes that you can use. This allows genre authors to drape their own unique ideas over familiar territory. Want to write a book about a Dinosaur PI – go ahead. Sherlock Holmes actually a Warlock – sorted. You can throw in crazy ideas and twists in the knowledge that the crime foundations they are built on are firm. The issue is that although the fantastical elements often work, the crime elements do not; writing ...

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review written by Sam Tyler on Tuesday 19th March 2019
Book Review

Titan Death by Guy Haley

Titan Death by Guy Haley

The 53rd and penultimate book in the epic Horus Heresy series and the brave soldiers of the Emperor attempt to hold back the armies of chaos from reaching Terra.

The line is drawn on Beta-Garmon and god-machines of the Adeptus Titanicus are at the front. Horus has defeated all that have stood before him, even the Emperor's own Executioner - the Primarch of the Space Wolves Leman Russ.

There only remains on more book after this one in Black Libraries momentous Horus Heresy...

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review written by Ant on Monday 18th March 2019
Book Review

Lies Sleeping by Ben Aaronovitch

Lies Sleeping by Ben Aaronovitch

Lies Sleeping is the seventh book (eighth if you count The Furthest Station) in the impressive River of London urban fantasy series, following Peter Grant - detective constable for the metropolitan police and apprentice wizard.

It looks like time may finally be up for the Faceless Man (Martin Chorley) as a joint police operation looks to ensnare the criminal mastermind. But even as the unwieldy might of the Metropolitan Police bears down on its foe, Peter uncovers clues that Chor...

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review written by Ant on Monday 11th March 2019
Book Review

Anansi Boys by Neil Gaiman

Anansi Boys by Neil Gaiman

Illustration ©2019 Francis Vallejo from The Folio Society edition of Neil Gaiman’s Anansi Boys.

The asymmetrical sequel to Gaiman’s American Gods, Anansi Boys makes use of the same dramatic conceit, that Gods exist and walk amongst us. However, this story from Gaiman is more of an urban folk tale, utilising a variety of authentic sources to bring us the myth of Anansi and his sons. This Folio Society edition is the ultimate treatment of Gaiman&rsqu...

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review written by Allen Stroud on Wednesday 6th March 2019
Book Review

The Telling by Ursula K Le Guin

The Telling by Ursula K Le Guin

What is religion?

Most of us aren’t used to contemplating that question too hard. The answer seems self-evident. In the world around us now, we have Christianity, Judaism, and Islam as the big three monotheistic religions. India and East Asia provide numerous examples of the polytheistic variety. It might be tempting to fall back on some seeming truism, such as, “all religions are about adherence to a set of rules,” but stray outside of those big three monotheis...

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review written by Matt Buscemi on Sunday 3rd March 2019
Book Review

Captain Marvel: Liberation Run by Tess Sharpe

Captain Marvel: Liberation Run by Tess Sharpe

It is not hard to see where Marvel Studios get all their ideas from as they sit upon a rich heritage of characters and storylines that will take decades to exhaust. I am somewhat of an old school Marvel fan and know the classic runs. Therefore, the newer creations flummox me. Captain Marvel is more new wave than my knowledge allows, but that has not stopped me looking forward to the upcoming feature film. What better way to enter the theatre, but by doing some revision in the form of Tess Sha...

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review written by Sam Tyler on Saturday 2nd March 2019
Book Review

Junction by Daniel M Bensen

Junction by Daniel M Bensen

Junction asks the question: what would we do if we had access to a brand new, virgin world? Would we destroy it like we are doing with our own world? Or would we learn from our mistakes and treat this as a second chance to do things right?

Daisuke Matsumori is a Japanese nature show host who happens to be in the right part of the world when the wormhole is discovered in the highlands of Papau New Guinea. Passing through the wormhole leads to an alien world of competing ecosystems, com...

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review written by Ant on Friday 1st March 2019
Book Review

Wrath of Empire by Brian McClellan

Wrath of Empire by Brian McClellan

There is a huge difference between a battle and a war. You can lose one, but still be victorious in the other. Or indeed win a battle, but overall be on the losing side. Brian McClellan’s latest trilogy set in the Powder Mage universe shows that even in a fantasy setting, war is hell. Whilst in Sins of Empire our heroes successful fought off the enemy forces, by Wrath of Empire a far superior enemy force has arrived and driven the battle wearer Mad Lancers from the capital. Can Lady Fli...

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review written by Sam Tyler on Thursday 28th February 2019
Book Review

The Hunger by Alma Katsu

The Hunger by Alma Katsu

The hardback version of The Hunger was originally launched last year and it drew some critical acclaim from authors including Sarah Pinborough and Joanne Harris. Both the Observer and the Guardian loved it. Stephen King said of it:

Deeply, deeply disturbing, hard to put down, not recommended reading after dark.

When the King of horror tells you a book is disturbing enough not to be read after dark, it warrants some serious attention. Now the paperback is out and SFBoo...

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review written by Ant on Wednesday 27th February 2019
Book Review

Blackfish City by Sam Miller

Blackfish City by Sam Miller

One of the many hats I wear is that of a professional software engineer. As a junior professional software engineer, I experienced acute imposter syndrome. It didn’t help that I was surrounded by people who had been engineering software for years, even decades, longer than I had.

I resolved my plight by doing what all software engineers do—I broke down the problems facing me into bite-sized, manageable chunks and dealt with them one at a time. I learned how to ask for help...

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review written by Matt Buscemi on Monday 25th February 2019
Book Review

Batman: The Killing Joke by Christa Faust

Batman: The Killing Joke by Christa Faust

The Batman Universe comes in all shades as long as they are dark blue, dark grey or black. You have your lighter fare such as LEGO Batman or the 60s incarnation and you also have your darker versions. Tim Burton’s Batman was dark, Christopher Nolan’s was darker still, but both owe homage to the iteration that really sold Batman as the Dark Knight; Alan Moore’s The Killing Joke, a one-off graphic novel that took Batman off in new a...

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review written by Sam Tyler on Saturday 23rd February 2019
Book Review

Corax Lord of Shadows by Guy Haley

Corax Lord of Shadows by Guy Haley

Corax Lord of Shadows is the tenth book in the pre-Horus Heresy Primarch series, featuring the leader of the Raven Guard. Set During the great Crusade, the immense void-cities of the Carinae must be brought under the control of the Imperium. Corax joins his Legion with an Imperial War Host to being the Carinae to heel. The void-cities are well defended however and at the height of this fierce conflict the void-city Zenith unleash a deadly ancient bio-weapon, bringing the imperial force t...

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review written by Ant on Thursday 21st February 2019
Book Review

The Ruin of Kings by Jenn Lyons

The Ruin of Kings by Jenn Lyons

The Ruin of Kings is the debut of Jenn Lyons, it's an impressive way to make an entrance. The beginning of epic fantasy series A Chorus of Dragons, the book has just been optioned to be turned into a TV series.

Growing up in the slums of the city Suur, Kihrin learns to entertain with music while also leading a secret life as a thief. Then he robs from the wrong house and he finds himself the attention of some powerful people. Despite some serious attempts to end his life which cumulat...

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review written by Ant on Monday 18th February 2019
Book Review

Brothers Keeper by Donald E Westlake

Brothers Keeper by Donald E Westlake

The world of crime is riddled with the worst vices known to man; murder, kidnapping, estate acquisition. It is also full of the most ruthless people; bank robbers, killers, monks. You may have noticed that a couple of elements snuck in there that are not always synonymous with crime fiction, but you may just find that a book all about a religious brotherhood trying to save their monastery is one of the warmest crime books you have read in a long while.

Even in the world of religious o...

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review written by Sam Tyler on Sunday 17th February 2019

Science fiction, fantasy & horror book reviews

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