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Book Review

All My Colors by David Quantick

All My Colors by David Quantick

There is no such thing as déjà vu, it is just your mind failing to process things properly. Even so, one day I was reading a book and was struck with a fearful sense of déjà vu. I could almost see what was going to happen next, it was unsettling. Was this a supernatural event? Had I gained super powers? Nope, turns out I had read the book ten years previously and forgotten. This is not a problem for Todd Milstead who has an eidetic memory so the book he is remember...

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review written by Sam Tyler on Wednesday 22nd May 2019
Book Review

Ancestral Night by Elizabeth Bear

Ancestral Night by Elizabeth Bear

Haimey is the engineer aboard the Singer, an interstellar salvage vessel named after its shipboard Intelligence. Haimey is genetically modified for zero-G, and she has brain-enhancing implants that connect her to the rest of the crew and chemically manage her emotional state. Haimey, Singer, and their pilot, Connla, discover an enormous wreck on the edge of inhabited space. The Derelict ship contains evidence of atrocities against one of the member races of the Synarche, the republic that gov...

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review written by Russ Brown on Tuesday 21st May 2019
Book Review

A Memory Called Empire by Arkady Martine

A Memory Called Empire by Arkady Martine

A Memory called Empire is the debut of Arkady Martine, although reading the book you'd be forgiven for thinking she's been writing best-sellers for years.

The vast, interstellar Empire of the Teixcalaanli have appointed Mahit Dzmare as new Ambassador to the capital. When she arrives she realises that her predecessor was murdered, but no-one wants to admit it wasn't an accidental death. Mahit is from a small colony, a fiercely independent mining station that is due to be annexed b...

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review written by Ant on Monday 20th May 2019
Book Review

Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury

Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury

Illustration ©2019 Tim McDonagh from The Folio Society edition of Ray Bradbury’s Something Wicked This Way Comes

The bright yellow cover of this Folio Society edition of Bradbury’s classic fantasy novel is inset with a cartoon-like carnival poster, clearly telegraphing what the reader might expect when they open the book and delve into the story of Jim and Will, whose lives are changed when, a week before Halloween, the carnival comes to town.

F...

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review written by Allen Stroud on Saturday 18th May 2019
Book Review

Thanos: Death Sentence by Stuart Moore

Thanos: Death Sentence by Stuart Moore

To anyone who has seen the latest Avengers movies you will know that Thanos is not a nice chap. He single handily (infinitely glovely) creates an intergalactic genocide. Despite this, the films try to give him some sympathetic elements; he only wipes out so many to save the whole. The Thanos of Stuart Moore’s Thanos: Death Sentence is not the Thanos of the films, but that of the comic books. This is an alien who has no interest in saving the galaxy for the long term, but wants to sit be...

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review written by Sam Tyler on Friday 17th May 2019
Book Review

Children of Ruin by Adrian Tchaikovsky

Children of Ruin by Adrian Tchaikovsky

The sequel to the 2016 Clarke Award winner, Children of Time, the story of the far future human and spider civilisations picks up several generations after the events at the end of the previous novel.

A terraforming team, led by Dirsa Senkovi and Yusuf Baltiel discover alien life on a far distant planet that they had been sent to make habitable for humans. Baltiel decides to preserve this life and Senkovi agrees to redirect their work to an ice planet on the edge of the viable zone. S...

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review written by Allen Stroud on Thursday 16th May 2019
Book Review

Broken Branches by Ben Ellis

Broken Branches by Ben Ellis

In the not too distant future, your social standing is based on the "purity" of your genes and the ability to trace your family through the "national family tree" genetic database. All men are sterile and fertility drugs are only given to state-sponsored couples whose genetic match are approved. Those who can't trace their lineage are known as "Broken Branches" and considered outcasts, shunned by society.

Grace and Charlie are twins and Broken Branches, but Grace is given a chance at ...

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review written by Ant on Wednesday 15th May 2019
Book Review

From Divergent Suns by Sam Peters

From Divergent Suns by Sam Peters

Science fiction is a minefield for any author. So many others genres are available that have a set of rules that you can follow. Crime has it, even most fantasy books follow a pattern, but science fiction can be almost anything. It can be set in an alternative today with only a tiny tweak to our way of life or it could be set many years into the future on a distant planet. Whatever the author chooses they need to produce a book that will sometimes have to take complex ideas and make them cohe...

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review written by Sam Tyler on Tuesday 7th May 2019
Book Review

A Time of Blood by John Gwynne

A Time of Blood by John Gwynne

Following the events of A Time of Dread, this book raises the stakes even further. Drem and friends flee the horrors at Starstone Lake. They must warn the Order of the Bright Star that a Demon has risen, but Fritha, the Demon's high Priestess has other ideas and is hot on their heels. Meanwhile, concealed in a forest Riv tries to come to terms with her half-breed heritage.

As the Demons forces multiply, they send a host to destroy the Angels stronghold. Drem and the Bright Stars ...

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review written by Ant on Monday 29th April 2019
Book Review

The City of Lost Fortunes by Bryan Camp

The City of Lost Fortunes by Bryan Camp

Post-Katrina New Orleans is haunted by history and destruction. Similar burdens are shouldered by the Street Magician Jude Dubuisson. He's got a gift of finding things people have lost - inherited from an unknown father. His gift has become an almost overwhelming curse following the storm, with so many things becoming lost his powers grow out of control. Then the New Orleans god of fortune is murdered and Jude is drawn back into a world he's been so desperate to leave. This is a hidden w...

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review written by Ant on Wednesday 24th April 2019
Book Review

The Crying Machine by Greg Chivers

The Crying Machine by Greg Chivers

Science documentary producer Greg Chivers’ first novel is a delightful combination of sci-fi, politics, and the three strange characters ensconced within them.

Chivers’ future Jerusalem is a city all but ignored as irrelevant by the world’s leaders, and in its anonymity the Holy City has become a haven for smugglers, exiles and extremists. While flying under the radar of the globe’s superpowers, the Middle Eastern metropolis teems with dubious characters, black...

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review written by Alice Wybrew on Monday 22nd April 2019
Book Review

No Way by S J Morden

No Way by S J Morden

No Way is the follow up to the gripping thriller One Way.  A perilous journey to the Red Planet by a group of convicts. Deciding that it was much more economically viable to train people that would have otherwise rotted in a jail rather than a group of experienced and highly trained Astronauts forms the basis of the story.

I can't really mention any more than that without spoilers to this first book - so if you haven't read One Way and are meaning to, it's best not to read any fu...

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review written by Ant on Friday 19th April 2019
Book Review

Master & Apprentice by Claudia Gray

Master & Apprentice by Claudia Gray

With the new films, TV shows and cartoons it is sometimes hard to keep up with the Star Wars Universe and all its moving parts. Some of the less fashionable elements could be ignored in favour of big flashy characters like Han Solo or Boba Fett. Thankfully, the Star Wars books are continuing to explore the entire timeline including the somewhat maligned The Phantom Menace. I am an apologist for this film and particularly liked the relationship between Jedi Knight, Qui-Gon Jinn, and his Padawa...

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review written by Sam Tyler on Tuesday 16th April 2019
Book Review

The Sign of Nine by G. S. Denning

The Sign of Nine by G. S. Denning

Warlock Holmes is back. No, not Sherlock, Warlock. If you think about it, what makes more sense; a man who can somehow divine everything from a few clues, or a Warlock who just uses magic to do the same? The Sign of Nine continues the premise that Sir Conan Doyle’s original stories were actually edited to remove all the magic bits. Here are Dr Watson’s real notes; were we see Warlock melting locks and Watson himself smoking bits of an ancient Mummy to harvest its hallucinogenic po...

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review written by Sam Tyler on Saturday 13th April 2019

Science fiction, fantasy & horror book reviews

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